1. sailoreverything:

    moonlightlace:

    harutenohs:

    i’m gonna capitalize on my one recent popular post and you can’t stop me

    all screencaps from sailormoonscreencaps and i reblogged all the text posts i used here

    please never stop

     I want all the Sailor Moon ones on my blog.

    (via octohocuspocus)

     

  2. mattkeanshair:

    gothiccharmschool:

    yesbrendonurie:

    cokeflow:

    You sing along to Panic At The Disco or you hop out of my car and walk

    by Fall Out Boy

    if you don’t understand why this is funny, I don’t think I can explain it to you. 

    by Panic! At The Disco

    (Source: fingerblaster113, via octohocuspocus)

     

  3. red-violins:

    one of the toughest aspects of mental illness is how often your goals fall by the wayside because the only goal you can afford is survival.

    (via octohocuspocus)

     

  4. "

    Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

    Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

    "
    — One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

    (via brizzenda)

     

  5. pumpkinspicelatkes:

    trans women belong at women’s colleges, trans men do not

    (via spoopily-toasty)

     

  6. "

    I asked myself what style we women could have adopted that would have been unmarked, like the men’s. The answer was none. There is no unmarked woman.

    There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

    Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

    If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

    Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

    I sometimes try to duck these variously marked choices by giving my title as “Dr.” — and in so doing risk marking myself as either uppity (hence sarcastic responses like “Excuse me!”) or an overachiever (hence reactions of congratulatory surprise like “Good for you!”).

    All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values. To some it will indicate that she is less herself, more identified by her husband’s identity. If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: she has done something; she has “kept her own name.” A man is never said to have “kept his own name” because it never occurs to anyone that he might have given it up. For him using his own name is unmarked.

    A married woman who wants to have her cake and eat it too may use her surname plus his, with or without a hyphen. But this too announces her marital status and often results in a tongue-tying string. In a list (Harvey O’Donovan, Jonathan Feldman, Stephanie Woodbury McGillicutty), the woman’s multiple name stands out. It is marked.

    "
     

  7. everyworldneedslove:

    aro-ace-wonderwoman:

    I swear a lot of people would be less confused about their sexual orientation if they knew that romantic orientations were also a thing.

    YES THIS IS TRUE. AND THAT THE TWO ORIENTATIONS DO NOT HAVE TO MATCH.

    (Source: aro-ace-skeleton-warrior, via a-little-bi-furious)

     

  8. officialtobio:

    officialtobio:

    where is that picture of a cartoon cat wearing four high heels that goes around every halloween to help people with anxiety

    image

    (via bismuthcladbattleship)

     
  9. rocklovejewelry:

    The Vikings did not celebrate Halloween, however in Scandinavia, Vetrnætr or “Winter Nights” occurred in October.

    More @ rocklovejewelry

    (via bismuthcladbattleship)

     

  10. what-purnpkin:

    kgschmidt:

    avelera:

    sunspotpony:

    prettyinpixiedust:

    So one day a dwarf is talking to a human and finally realizes that when humans say woman, they generally mean “person who is theoretically capable of childbirth” because for whatever reason, humans…